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Jan 30, 2020 | Post by: Jack Altschuler No Comments

Inspiration – v7.0

Reading time -39 seconds  .  .  .

Great leadership is, in part, centered around the issue of inspiration. Indeed, a 2018 survey done by the Zenger-Folkman organization and published in the Harvard Business Review Blog focused on boss-employee behavior and sheds light on this issue.

Their study centered on how U.S. employees see their boss and came up with a top 10 list of what causes these employees to say that their boss is a bad boss. It’s something of a reverse barometer, in the sense that if you do the opposite of the bad boss behaviors depicted in the study, you’ll probably be a pretty good boss.

According to this extensive survey, the number one reason employees see their direct supervisor as a bad boss is:

1. Failure to inspire owing to a lack of energy and enthusiasm

Your people are looking to you for inspiration and if you don’t supply it, they have a problem with their boss. And this gets worse, because in this full employment economy, your people know that they don’t have to put up with a boss who doesn’t meet their needs.

And the story gets even worse than that, because your lower performers will likely play it safe and stay where they are. The people most likely to bolt (called “voluntary quits”) are your best people.

So, the message for you is clear: Show up with energy and enthusiasm if you want your people’s best efforts, longer employee retention of your best people and the best business outcomes.

Next post: A vivid example of what this looks like.

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Copyright 2020 by Jack Altschuler and Fully Alive Leadership. All rights reserved. Reproduction and sharing are encouraged, providing proper attribution is given.

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